LATEST ADDITIONS

Review: Ken Kessler, Lab: Paul Miller  |  Oct 01, 2020
hfnoutstandingAs boutique Italian brand Franco Serblin prepares to boost its range we look at the iconic flagship

Franco Serblin, who passed away in 2013, first unveiled his flagship Ktêma in 2010. He had left Sonus faber, which he founded in 1983, in 2006, so the Ktêma was in development for nearly five years before he felt it was ready to be sold by the new company bearing his name. I remember the tension during its gestation, and Franco's elation at being able to produce a no-compromise system – not that he was ever restrained at Sonus faber. Think of the phenomenal Extrema, Guarneri and Stradivarius. The wait for the Ktêma proved worth it – as did the anticipation lasting a decade to hear a pair in my own system.

Christopher Breunig  |  Sep 29, 2020
This month we review and test releases from: Behzod Abduraimov, Lucerne SO/James Gaffigan, Nicola Benedetti, LPO/Vladimir Jurowski; Petr Limonov, Derek Smith Trio, Luxembourg PO/Gustav Gimeno and Duisburger Philharmoniker/Jonathan Darlington.
Ken Kessler  |  Sep 28, 2020
This month we review: Al Di Meola, Fred Neil, James Taylor and Twisted Sister.
Ken Kessler  |  Sep 28, 2020
This month, we review: T Rex, The Box Tops, Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes and The Monkees.
Mike Barnes  |  Sep 28, 2020
This month we review: Seasick Steve, Fontaines DC, Sam Prekop and The Pretenders.
Steve Harris  |  Sep 28, 2020
This month we review: Chris Montague, Ambrose Akinmusire, Andrew Mccormack and Kevin Figes Quartet.
Christopher Breunig  |  Sep 28, 2020
This month we review: Beethoven, L'heure Bleu, Mussorgsky/Ravel, and R Strauss.
Review: Tim Jarman, Lab: Paul Miller  |  Sep 25, 2020
hfnvintageDesigned to be worthy of the company's flagship Beolab 5000 system, this late '60s turntable was the last conventional deck to top the B&O range. How does it sound?

The argument for building a system using components from different manufacturers because 'no company is good at everything' is a good one – up to a point. Conversely, the Japanese heavyweights such as Sony, Technics and JVC were once able to put together a fairly convincing complete package, as could Philips (on a good day!).

Review: Adam Smith, Lab: Paul Miller  |  Sep 24, 2020
hfncommendedMasters of retro chic, Yamaha has evolved its one-time flagship A-S3000 integrated amplifier into a fully-fledged pre/power. And there's not a digital input in sight...

Talk to audiophiles that grew up through the 1990s and the chances are they associate brands such as Sony, Yamaha, Onkyo, Pioneer and Denon with meaty AV receivers and, possibly, mini systems. The reason is that it was around this time that the major Japanese corporations began directing their energies into developing products for the burgeoning home cinema market, meaning these younger hi-fi enthusiasts never really saw them flex their design muscles in the stereo arena.

Johnny Black  |  Sep 22, 2020
As more groups turn to touring to generate revenue, Johnny Black casts an eye over the more innovative ways some bands are winning over fans

It used to be so simple. Back in the day, music artists recorded albums and then went out on expensive tours, often making a loss, in order to promote and sell considerable quantities of their LPs. The big money then was in the vinyl, and that vinyl was largely under the control of a handful of major international music corporations, such as EMI, CBS, Warner Bros, Polygram and their ilk.

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