Audiophile Digital

Sort By:  Post Date TitlePublish Date
Ken Kessler  |  Oct 25, 2019
This month, we review: Keith Richards, Dana Gillespie, Paul Mauriat and Richard Thompson
Ken Kessler  |  Sep 17, 2019
This month, we review: Lulu, Bob Dylan, Flamin' Groovies and Charlie Rich
Ken Kessler  |  Aug 28, 2019
This month, we review: Miles Davis, The Action, Jimi Hendrix and The Hues Corporation
Ken Kessler  |  Jul 25, 2019
This month, we review: The Leiber-Stoller Big Band, Bob Dyla, Henry Mancini and Pink Floyd
Ken Kessler  |  Jun 20, 2019
This month, we review: John Lennon, The Debutantes, Art Garfunkel and Jethro Tull
Ken Kessler  |  May 14, 2019
This month, we review: Simon And Garfunkel, The Eagles, Eddie and the Hot Rods, and The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band,
Ken Kessler  |  Apr 03, 2019
This month, we review: Alexander Spence, Murray Head, Marillion, & Poco
Ken Kessler  |  Mar 06, 2019
This month, we review: Nazareth, Rick Derringer, The Louvin Brothers, & The Percy Phillips Studio Collection
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 01, 2018
This month, we review: The Doors, The Guess Who, Billy Squier and Negro Church Music.
Ken Kessler  |  Nov 01, 2018
This month, we review: Eleanor Mcevoy, The Flying Burrito Bros, Glenn Frey, and Spirit.
Ken Kessler  |  Oct 01, 2018
This month, we review: Supertramp, Gene Clark, Jethro Tull, and The Who.
Ken Kessler  |  Sep 01, 2018
This month, we review: Love, Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, and Linda Ronstadt
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
If not quite as monumental a milestone in her career as Heart Like A Wheel, this album from 1977 stands almost as proud for its portrayal of Ronstadt as a far more versatile singer than her previous country-rock leanings suggested – a genre she helped to fashion. Here she ranges from straight rock ’n’ roll to ballads to pure C&W, if not quite intimating that a few years later she would become one the first of the rock generation to cover the standards of the 1940s/50s. True to form, this set also emphasises her immaculate, prescient taste: among the tracks she commandeers as her own are Roy Orbison’s ‘Blue Bayou’, the Rolling Stones’ ‘Tumbling Dice’, and a hardly-known Warren Zevon’s ‘Poor Poor Pitiful Me’. Sound Quality: 92% .
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
As has been de rigueur of late, Swiss-born Beat Kaestli has joined Tony Bennett, Rod Stewart, Michael Bublé and others releasing ‘American Songbook’ sessions. Kaestli, though, has resisted the more obvious A-list songs and opted for ‘slightly-less-covered’ masterworks, including ‘My Romance’, ‘Day In Day Out’ and other tunes that are familiar rather than done to death. Backed by a superb quintet and recorded at St Peter’s Episcopal Church, NY, with David Chesky at the controls, it’s a perfect showcase for SACD surround, which seems to be enjoying a renaissance. Kaestli’s emphasis is jazzier than the norm, a refreshing break from Sinatra wannabees.
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
Interesting re-packaging of the US version of Hendrix’s debut, but not absolutely necessary if you bought this 17-track expanded release in 1997. This adds only cooler packaging and a 17-minute DVD of engineer Eddie Kramer and three now-departed figures – Hendrix’s one-time manager, Chas Chandler, and the members of the Experience, Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding – talking about the recording sessions. But if you don’t own any Hendrix, this is the best place to start: it’s an utterly incendiary album bursting with invention, the blueprint for psychedelia, jazz-rock and so much more. An ear-opener then, a touchstone now for every guitarist since.

Pages

X