Audiophile Digital

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Ken Kessler  |  Aug 28, 2019
This month, we review: Miles Davis, The Action, Jimi Hendrix and The Hues Corporation
Ken Kessler  |  Jul 25, 2019
This month, we review: The Leiber-Stoller Big Band, Bob Dyla, Henry Mancini and Pink Floyd
Ken Kessler  |  Jun 20, 2019
This month, we review: John Lennon, The Debutantes, Art Garfunkel and Jethro Tull
Ken Kessler  |  May 14, 2019
This month, we review: Simon And Garfunkel, The Eagles, Eddie and the Hot Rods, and The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band,
Ken Kessler  |  Apr 03, 2019
This month, we review: Alexander Spence, Murray Head, Marillion, & Poco
Ken Kessler  |  Mar 06, 2019
This month, we review: Nazareth, Rick Derringer, The Louvin Brothers, & The Percy Phillips Studio Collection
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 01, 2018
This month, we review: The Doors, The Guess Who, Billy Squier and Negro Church Music.
Ken Kessler  |  Nov 01, 2018
This month, we review: Eleanor Mcevoy, The Flying Burrito Bros, Glenn Frey, and Spirit.
Ken Kessler  |  Oct 01, 2018
This month, we review: Supertramp, Gene Clark, Jethro Tull, and The Who.
Ken Kessler  |  Sep 01, 2018
This month, we review: Love, Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, and Linda Ronstadt
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
Interesting re-packaging of the US version of Hendrix’s debut, but not absolutely necessary if you bought this 17-track expanded release in 1997. This adds only cooler packaging and a 17-minute DVD of engineer Eddie Kramer and three now-departed figures – Hendrix’s one-time manager, Chas Chandler, and the members of the Experience, Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding – talking about the recording sessions. But if you don’t own any Hendrix, this is the best place to start: it’s an utterly incendiary album bursting with invention, the blueprint for psychedelia, jazz-rock and so much more. An ear-opener then, a touchstone now for every guitarist since.
Yes
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
Although ‘progressive rock’ remains a smug oxymoron, Yes were the least aggravating of all the snots who smarmed their way across the music firmament from the late-1960s onward. This was their third, the 1971 set that proved to be a massive breakthrough, setting the stage for their masterpiece, Fragile. It’s all here: virtuoso playing, airy harmonies, the sub-Tolkien/post-2001 mystical mumbo-jumbo. To play a track called ‘Starship Trooper’ with a straight face… who am I to deem a few million fans devoid of taste? But if my remarks on prog-rock seem harsh, never forget that we have to thank it for this: the backlash to the genre was punk.
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
Since I saw JT on this particular tour, maybe I’m prejudiced, but, damn! this performance is a textbook example of how to charm an audience. Despite the size of the venue, and the clearly stoned crowd, it could have been an intimate coffee shop gig. The sound is clear as a bell, and every one of the 14 tracks is so familiar (to elder baby boomers) that they’re bound to bring tear to eye. Taylor remains the pinnacle of singer-songwriter bliss, particularly for those who favour the unplugged, not-entirely-maudlin sort, as far removed from Leonard Cohen or Nick Drake as the range of human emotions allows.
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
Like the epic blues LP, Fathers & Sons, which combined young and old, here we find three generations of rock guitarists – Jimmy Page, U2’s The Edge and Jack White – swapping tales, gigging and generally celebrating the electric guitar. Too many moments make this a must-see if you’re a fan of any or all of the performers: historical footage of Page in the early 1960s, The Edge recounting how he and his brother made an electric guitar from scratch, even winding the coils. And to see Page declining to harmonise in a rendition of ‘The Weight’ on the grounds that he ‘can’t sing’ (!) – this is one of the most captivating rock docs in years. Sound Quality: 90% .
Ken Kessler  |  Dec 10, 2010
A renowned gig with Satchmo celebrating his 60th birthday at one of the world’s greatest jazzfests, backed by Billy Kyle (piano), Barney Bigard (clarinet), Trummy Young (trombone), Mort Herbert (bass), Danny Barcelona (drums) and Velma Middleton sharing the vocals – if you can’t locate the CD, the silky, wider-than-Rhode Island stereo will qualify this download the best $10 you ever spent on New Orleans sizzle. Classic material – ‘Tiger Rag’, ‘Mack The Knife’, ‘St. Louis Blues’, a brace of tunes from High Society, ‘Stompin’ At The Savoy’, culminating in ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ and ‘Happy Birthday, Louis!’. ‘Utterly joyous’ is the only way to describe it.

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